Scary Dive Experiences

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7 users have voted.
1stSSF Foxhound's picture
Thanks for all the fish
Points: 10302

Most divers who have over 30 dives must have had at least one scary experience diving.

I must say I have had a few already, lucky me !!!

First one was seeing reef sharks if that is what kind it was, our group went to the bottom by the reef and chilled to let them do their thing and move on, so we waited about 10 minutes before cutting our dive short and surfacing. I remembered the movie series Jaws and such while waiting which heightened the suspense hehehe!!! This is why we always need to keep an eye out on how much air we have left.

Second one was I think in costa rica. Not the greatest visibility dive because of the current lifting the sand, but was still worth it. I was coming back up, and when I paused for a decompression stop. As I am waiting around, i'm looking around and then look up. I suddenly get the feeling I was not coming up easy this time. All I see is a huge school of jelly fish near the surface. Omg, which way to go to surface? For about 10 min I searched for a hole in the gathering of jelly fish and to my lucky break I found one and surfaced. Then paddling to the boat was a bit far, but I just did not want to get stung on my way to the boat, which I got lucky for as well, saw a few jelly fish within 2 feet of me on the way.

They are nice specie to enhance a photo but no hugs for them I believe hehehe !!!!

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3 users have voted.

Diving in 32F water at 80 feet I had my reg start to free flow. At my Safety stop found out that I was too light at 15F. Great learning experience as to why the rules are the rules.

+1 for Drysuit diving.

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3 users have voted.

I had my first stage fail at about 25m, and the dive instructors were lying when they said that a failed reg will not stop air flow, this just stopped, no warning. Tried my occy, nothing either. Luckily I had a pony bottle, and if I didn't my dive buddy was just behind me.

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4 users have voted.
stezza's picture
Thanks for all the fish
Points: 11193

Sorry, I don't know a heck of a lot about scuba diving.
What is a "pony bottle"?

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5 users have voted.

It's a smaller tank with it's own reg that I strap to myself when I do a deep dive. That day we were dropping down the anchor rope in 35m, but I didn't make it all the way down before my regs failed. Like what this guy has.

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2 users have voted.

A smaller backup scuba unit that hangs on your side. Very useful tool.

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3 users have voted.

Technically that's an "alternate air source". The pony bottle is simply the tank. Alternate air source defines a setup that provides air completely separately of your typical air supply. I use a 40cf pony bottle, first stage with a button gauge and a single secondary primary regulator for my alternate air source. I carry mine stage rigged similar to that picture, but mine is cross hung from left to right with the reg facing outward under a pony bottle strap setup so it just pulls out if need be. Never needed to use it, but you never know when you might.


From birth man carries the weight of gravity on his shoulders. He is bolted to the earth. But man has only to sink beneath the surface and he is free. - Jacques Cousteau

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6 users have voted.
1stSSF Foxhound's picture
Thanks for all the fish
Points: 10302

Thank you guys for posting your stories. I can't imagine a failing regulator at depth, ouchies !!!

When I used to wear contact lenses, I once had to rinse my mask and 1 of my contacts moved to the corner of my eye, so I saw well with 1 eye for the rest of the dive. At least I had a buddy and 1 eye to guide me around until the surface. :-) cheers !!!

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4 users have voted.

Yeah, it was a bit of a freakout. Especially as the regs were just serviced.

I am so reluctant to have anyone touch my regs these days, every time I get them serviced, and not always with the same person, they always come back with something not right.

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0 users have voted.
HK Phooey's picture
Aye aye captain!
Points: 14498

Do a course and learn how to service your own mate. You're going to have to be able to do that eventually if you get into expedition diving. Sure you may not have all the tools, but any helpful dive centre should be willing to let you use theirs if you do the servicing course with them.

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3 users have voted.

Redundancy for the win!

Hey Krisper, I'm exactly the same. Not afraid to admit that I'm paranoid about anybody touching my reg's and I always go over them with a fine tooth comb after they've been in anybody else's hands.

Xi.

Regards,

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2 users have voted.
Sea admiral
Points: 26654

I never had a faulty reg under water, but i do the Service on my own.
Once a Buddy of me had a broken 2 stage. The inhaling Membrane was broken and he get a nice water air mix instead of pure air.
He took my alternate air source and we quit the dive safely.

Worst that ever happen to me was a scooter dive i guid where one of the divers got lost.
After the longest 10 min in my life he decide to come to the surface and we found him.
So do your Buddys a favour and do what you learned when you miss your Buddy.

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1 user has voted.
Hornet85's picture
Need for speed-boat
Points: 8243

Deepth: 87m
Gear: OC
TaD: 13:15

I hade been down ther for abut 11min, when i got stuck, wher not able to move at all, did not even see the fishing net, i wher not able to move back or forth. I tryed to get my knife back behind my tanks to cut free, but nothing. so after 5min trying to think abut what to do i decided to get out of my gear. so i got out of my harnes, and wher able to see what hade happened, it wher a steel wire from a fising net that wher stuck around my regulators, and no way to cut with a knife, i closed of my left regulator and unscruved it (DIN) then i wher able to untagle the wire and put the regulator back. that wher probebly the most scary thing i have done under water.
But i live to tel abut it :D

Sorry for my bad english, not my first language.

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